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Canadian Wind Energy
Date: 5/28/2010 Album ID: 1013784
Photos by Russ Dillingham
Pages: 1 2
Photos from a 5 day trip to the Gaspe Peninsula in Quebec Province in Canada to document wind farms that have been around for a decade.
Anse-A-Valleau Wind Farm Site operations supervisor Marc Chretien is dwarfed by one of the Wind turbines.
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Human resources director Marc Frenette at LM Glasfiber Canada Inc. in Gaspe, walks past some of the blades his company produces.
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The LM Glasfiber Canada Inc.plant in Gaspe has replaced many of the traditional fishing, pulp and paper and mining jobs in the area.
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The LM Glasfiber Canada Inc.plant in Gaspe has replaced many of the traditional fishing, pulp and paper and mining jobs in the area.
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Gigantic bolts help hold the towers in place. Anse-A-Valleau Wind Farm.
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Murdochville interim town manager Ernest Gallen talks about how the town nearly closed after the copper mine shut down.
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Murdochville interim town manager Ernest Gallen talks about how the town nearly closed after the copper mine shut down.
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Frederic Cote, general manager of the Wind Energy TechnoCentre in the city of Gaspé talks about wind energy in his office.
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Frederic Cote, general manager of the Wind Energy TechnoCentre in the city of Gaspé talks about wind energy in his office.
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Anse-A-Valleau Wind Farm Site operations supervisor Marc Chretien looks out over the turbines turning.
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A lone tower is backlit in the Anse-a-Valleau wind farm.
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Towers that seem to be placed haphazardly are actually strategically located so the turbulance created by one does not have a significant effect on the others.
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Towers that seem to be placed haphazardly are actually strategically located so the turbulance created by one does not have a significant effect on the others.  These are in Murdochville
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The town of Murdochville nearly closed when the copper mine left town.  Wind energy has helped stimulate the economy and brought jobs to the area.
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The setting sun casts it's glow on the Carier Energie Eolienne Wind Farm in Carleton.
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The setting sun casts it's glow on the Carier Energie Eolienne Wind Farm in Carleton.
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Many wind farms, like the one in Carleton, choose to use snowmobiles and other odd looking machinery to access the towers in winter.  Roads often need plowing several times a day in the winter, so alternative modes of tarnsportation have evolved.
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Steve Labrie, manager for the Carleton Wind Farm, operated by Cartier Energie Eolienne, talks about how he migrated from a job in the paper mill to a wind farm.
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